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Women quicksand movie scenes

F or the first 20 minutes that year-old hiker Ryan Osmun was stuck in quicksand, he thought everything would be all right. Fifty minutes after sinking, Osmun still felt optimistic. Instead, his right leg sank up to his thigh and he found himself unable to pull it out. He waited through the night for rescuers during a snowstorm, his life endangered not by suffocation but by exposure. And why has the plotline now sunk out of sight? Arguably, God started it. Quicksand was first a crucial plot device in the Bible. In , quicksand first appeared on screen in a minute melodrama, Saved from the Quicksand , in which a young woman is rescued by hooded monks. Engber found that by , quicksand was past it, appearing in less than 0. Yet things may have been more simple than that.
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Thanks to all for contributions to the list Based on long term searches by a LOT of folks, I do not believe these scenes exist.
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The fourth-graders were unanimous: Quicksand doesn't scare them, not one bit. If you're a 9- or year-old at the P. Big waves at the beach that might separate a girl from her mother.
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I have been a doctor's wife for almost 2 years - and we have been together for about 7 years, since right before intern year. I don't think you should abandon the relationship just because she is lds. The woman's role is to grow up, marry a worthy priesthood holder, and have a lot of kids. Thanks for pointing this stuff out. I knew I was going to be alone much of the time and for the most part I can handle it. I would do it all over again and thank my lucky stars that I found this man, that he loves, and that I love him. Oh, and remember LDS girls are usually good at leading guys on with potential sex to get guys to agree to what they want join the church. As a budding feminist, I left the church in my teens. If you end up marrying a true believing Mormon, your marriage will be a threesome. I met this girl a while ago and we really hit it off.
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In the endвthe very endвGod loves my husband even more than I love him. She likely hasn't had many long-term relationships and has no idea what dynamics are involved in one. The doctrinal and afterlife issues around a non-temple marriage are an entirely different topic, and one that I am personally much more at peace with than my questions about how one might make an interfaith marriage work in this life. Let me say this so you can get an idea of just how crazy and how much your girl friend is into the Mormon religion: These are known as "garments". Leave her so you can both find people that youre more suited for. I get sweet texts some morning when he is on his way to the office and that's all it takes the rest of my day is amazing. Welcome to the future. His fellow resident is married and seems like a good guy, I want to believe my bf will change. I intend to spend some quality time in the temple, with my bishop, and with close family and friends as I think and pray my way through this decision, but I would also value your insights into this. When I see my boyfriend hard at work, it also inspires me to improve and challenge myself in my own way.
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The fourth-graders were unanimous: Quicksand doesn't scare them, not one bit. If you're a 9- or year-old at the P. Big waves at the beach that might separate a girl from her mother. Thirty years ago, quicksand might have sprung up at recess, in pools of discolored asphalt or the dusty corners of the sandbox—step in the wrong place, and you'd die. But not anymore, a boy named Zayd tells me.

His classmates nod. For now, quicksand has all but evaporated from American entertainment—rejected even by the genre directors who once found it indispensable. There isn't any in this summer's fantasy blockbuster Prince of Persia: Sands of Time or in last year's animated jungle romp Up. You won't find quicksand in The Last Airbender or Avatar , either. Giant scorpions emerge from the sand in Clash of the Titans , but no one gets sucked under. And what about Lost —a tropical-island adventure series replete with mud ponds and dangling vines?

That show, which ended in May, spanned six seasons and roughly 85 hours of television airtime—all without a single step into quicksand. It felt old-fashioned. Quicksand once offered filmmakers a simple recipe for excitement: A pool of water, thickened with oatmeal, sprinkled over the top with wine corks.

It was, in its purest form, a plot device unburdened by character, motivation, or story: My god, we're sinking! Will we escape this life-threatening situation before time runs out? Those who weren't rescued simply vanished from the script: It's too late—he's gone.

The alternative was no less random: Surviving quicksand has always required more serendipity than skill. Is that a lasso over there? A tendril from a banyan tree? Cuse throws up his hands at the thought. If you're working in an old genre, you have to figure out ways to make it fresh.

A full generation has elapsed since that evolutionary step was taken in Such truisms sidestep a deeper, stickier question: Why does one gag fall by the wayside while another soldiers on? Movie villains have long since given up tying their victims to the railroad tracks , yet they never seem to weary of planting time bombs.

Think how many colored wires were snipped in The Hurt Locker. And quicksand? Time was, a director could sink a man in the desert and still win the Oscar for best picture. Today, that gimmick has been scorned in third-rate schlock.

Whatever its Q score , quicksand has always been more than a popcorn-spilling antic. As a literary metaphor and an expression of entanglement, the image dates back hundreds of years. As rhetoric, it once ruled the foreign-policy debate: Vietnam was "the quicksand war" before it was a quagmire; half a million troops were mired in the jungles of southeast Asia, swallowed up by a plot device of the Cold War.

And it wasn't so long ago that the phenomenon of real quicksand—not the metaphor, not the gag—flummoxed the nation's leading physicists. Could all these anxieties be related? Might our fascination with quicksand reflect some more singular preoccupation—a broad cultural reckoning, even—with ambivalence and instability?

Before we can answer those questions, let's pinpoint when quicksand's status began to falter. Carlton Cuse, the longtime television producer, offers a clue. He didn't write any quicksand into Lost , but he did put some in another show, years earlier. So there you have it: For one pop-culture professional, at least, the gag still had its mojo back in October By the time the Lost pilot was aired in the fall of , it had disappeared. One day in late February , a year-old electronics sales associate named Duncan Edwards was sitting at a computer in Dallas running keywords through a Usenet search.

A moment later, he found himself staring at a primitive home page with bright yellow wallpaper. At its center was a pixilated graphic—a clip-art collage—showing a stand of cattails and a white pith helmet floating in a pool of sludge. The name of the site appeared just above: The Quicksand! He'd stumbled across an online community of quicksand enthusiasts—kindred spirits, it turns out.

Some were "sinkers": Those who crave the sensation of being mired in deep mud, the suction that's created when you step into water-logged clay. The stories they post to the group message boards—which have flourished over the past 15 years— suggest a shared spirit of adventure. Last summer, one quicksand fan set up a collaborative Google map for sinking holes, which now has more than sites marked around the world—from the tidal muds near San Diego, Calif. Holes are assigned a score from 1 to 10, depending on amenities like privacy, depth, thickness, and available parking.

Edwards is a different kind of quicksand fan, though. He has no interest in getting muddy himself—he's more a looker than a doer , someone who likes to see pictures and film-clips of other people being submerged. Not every looker has the same tastes: Edwards calls himself a knees-to-waist kind of guy; others prefer someone stuck to the armpits; and still more are into "grim endings"—where the sinker disappears below the surface in a trail of mud bubbles.

Headfirst sinkings appeal to a small but dedicated minority. To hear a quicksand fan describe his interest can be unnerving: Many describe what amounts to a sexual fascination with helpless women flailing for their lives. But there's more to the fetish than a bondage fantasy. For some, the excitement hinges on a damsel-in-distress melodrama with a heroic rescue. The mythology of quicksand can be just as inspiring on its own terms—conveying a nostalgia, erotic or not, for old-time serials and wilderness tales. One member of the community, "Crypto," describes feeling a sexual attraction to the quicksand itself, as opposed to whoever or whatever happens to be trapped in it.

He doesn't care whether the victim is male or female, human or animal. As a little boy, he was drawn to a scene from the Disney film, Swiss Family Robinson , in which a zebra sinks into a mud bog. Like many quicksand fans—Crypto included—Duncan Edwards has a good job, a wife, and children. He's creative, working in his off-hours as a writer, photographer, and director of quicksand fan films. Other members of the community create and share comics, short stories, and graphics. When we speak by phone, Edwards describes his predilection with a disarming frankness and a bit of Southern charm.

He hopes my article will help others with "the interest" have the sort of epiphany he experienced 15 years ago. I'm not alone ," he says. If you want to use that word. The online forums now draw up to 1, members from around the world.

Their ringleaders are in their late 40s or early 50s—people who came of age when quicksand was in its zenith. But the disappearance of quicksand from pop culture doesn't perturb Edwards. Indeed, he's sure there's never been a better time to be a fan. An interest that was once relegated to tiny blurbs in the back of Splosh! Thanks to the Internet, "we just happen to be at the golden moment," Edwards says.

If you really want to understand quicksand—if you're looking for some way to gauge its rise and fall in American culture—then the fetish community is the place to start. By the mids, individual quicksand fans were already conducting their own private surveys of the genre, and making libraries of scenes dubbed to VHS. With communication came the possibility of collaboration, and a more structured way to assemble this knowledge. Clips were shared over the Internet, and the community began working together to dig up new, undiscovered examples of quicksand cinema.

They scoured the shelves at video-rental stores for movies with island or jungle in their titles. They sifted through IMDB plot summaries and discussed ways to keep the metaphorical uses of quicksand from polluting their Google searches. References to the New York-based post-hardcore band Quicksand proved especially annoying. And sometimes they relied on dumb luck: One day, Duncan Edwards happened to pick up a copy of Life magazine from at a flea market, and, flipping through the pages, found a film publicity still showing pin-up girl Anita Ekberg sinking in a pool of sand and water.

He shared the news, and the race was on for the original footage. This hive-mind project—to identify every quicksand scene, ever—will soon have extended across two decades. Whenever a new scene was identified, a deep-mud enthusiast and entrepreneur in California named Dave Lodoski would add the clip to an ever-growing video archive. Then he'd stack the scenes in tapes with names like "Female QS Volume 2" and sell them to other fans via snail mail. The collective effort extends beyond the tapes, however.

Plenty of scenes have been identified but never copied or ripped from a DVD. To keep track of each discovery and loose end, the user named "Crypto" took on the role of encyclopedist. Known informally as "Crypto's List," it's now been through 28 published versions; the most recent contains more than 1, entries, starting with the silent Gaumont melodrama "Rescued from the Quicksand" from and ending with an episode of the Japanese anime series, Deltora Quest , from The list is a quixotic and startlingly thorough record of sinking scenes in scripted TV and feature films, as well as commercials, video games, reality shows, cartoons, documentaries, and music videos.

Crypto has identified wet jungle quicksands and dry desert pits, bogs and quagmires, areas of wet cement—even scenes of people sinking into giant vats of caviar. For those with "the interest," the guide serves as an enormous Netflix queue, a sort of collector's catalog or a fetish to-do list. For everyone else, it's a sui generis chronicle of America's preoccupation with quicksand. If Carlton Cuse of Lost is right that adventure gags must evolve, then Crypto's List is the nearest we have to a fossil record.

With some careful parsing of the data, it's possible to trace the evolution of quicksand on a graph—to plot its cultural importance from one decade to the next. We can take just the full-length films on Crypto's List, for example—more than in all—and count how many were released in each era.

That gives a sense of how much sinking appeared on-screen at any given time. Then we might compare the number of movies with quicksand to the total number of films released and calculate a percentage for each decade. The volume of Hollywood production waxed and waned and waxed again over the years.



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